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Thursday, 13 December 2007

Nazim Tulyakhodzayev "There Will Come Soft Rains" - Ray Bradbury - (Visions of Future Past 2)













There Will Come Soft Rains directed in the Soviet era by Uzbekistan's Nazim Tulyakhodzayev in 1984, is set in Allendale, California between the 31st December 2026 and New Year's Day. It is based on the Ray Bradbury story which in turn was inspired by the 1920 poem by Sara Teasdale. 1984 was a good year to make the movie for it foretells an age when mankind has been taken over by robots. Indeed the only humans we see are dust. Thus the image I choose to illustrate the movie is perhaps a trifle misleading though I consider it irony. It commences with an egg being fried for breakfast. An all powerful robot does the chores, directs the humans, repels invaders. Trouble is the inhabitants of this world are long since expired. When a white pigeon ventures into the establishment Armageddon is the merest lurch of a robot away. The thunderous tones of the narrator, the dark imagery and bleak conclusion suggest a grim experience. You'd be right. Tulyakhodzayev is an outstanding director however and conscious of the need for light in the darkness. Bing Crosby's "The Moon Was Yellow" is played on the gramophone and imbues the scene with a quintessentially American feel good atmosphere against an open window and warm light. This does not overcome the dramatic mistreatment of the statue of Christ on the cross at the end as prayer comes to no avail. A very comprehensive and well written review of the 10 minute movie is provided by Phil Nichols. The eloquent final words of Sara Teasdale's poem sum up the theme of this remarkable Soviet animation:
Not one would mind, neither bird nor tree,
If mankind perished utterly;
And Spring herself, when she woke at dawn
Would scarcely know that we were gone.

2 comments:

Phil said...

A nice review - thanks for the complimentary link to my own review!

- Phil Nichols

Anonymous said...

That's not Bing Crosby singing The Moon Was Yellow. Crosby recorded it in 1934, but this recording is earler and by a singer I've not heard before. Dying to know who it is.