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Sunday, 1 March 2009

Tatiana Mititello "The Apple Cake"























I see some odd animations and this one takes the biscuit, or more precisely the pie. The Apple Cake makes no literal sense so enjoy it for its considerable surreal qualities, not to mention the élan with which it is directed by Tatiana Mititello. The scenario .... taking a breath: a man is baked an apple pie by his doting wife. It is a huge pie that seems to grow frame by frame. It defies gravity too taking off on a soaring journey with its baker, baker's husband and pet cat, shortly to be joined by a dashing pilot, goat, duck and eventually a blue elephant and fully laden apple tree. The reason for all this? Inadvertently the woman has cooked a slice of the sky. Clear? I could understand if the movie were made in the 1960s when that sort of thing was allegedly de rigeur. In fact it is from the great Soyuzmultfilm Studio and made in 1991 which goes to show I guess that glasnost had much to answer for in the Soviet era. No wonder there was dissolution of the empire although in fairness everything is harmonious on the floating pie. Expertly animated with a rich palette of orange, yellow and blue together with simply bizarre moments: the duck bathing in the clouds, the airplane pilot playing trapeze and the elephant letting the sky out of the pie - which brings them all down to earth. The movie was based on a Joan Aiken short story, There's Some Sky in This Pie. Aitkin is known to me for her fantasy The Wolves of Willoughby, a logically argued children's novel in which a Victorian England is perpetuated beyond its naturally allotted span. The pie in the sky story would seem to be considerably dafter than that. Fun though. Like yesterday, I have dipped in to the seemingly inexhaustible YouTube channel of pavlovich74. Alexander Kurlyandsky was the writer, with art director Tatiana Stroeva getting it spot on with the lavish colour and characters; and I leave till last an unusual and entirely appropriate jazz score, though I am not convinced it was at the correct speed, by Vladimir Kutuzov.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hello, Ian!
I read your animationblog with huge interest :) espesially entries on Russian films.

Sometime I translate the Western reviews into Russian and post in my Live Journal. As a rule, they have a big commotions from Russian bloggers.

What do you say if I'll translate this text about Tatiana Mititello's film "The Apple Cace"?

:)
Alexander Sedov
http://alek-morse.livejournal.com

Ian Lumsden said...

In short, Alexander, I should be delighted. As I have written here, Russian animation is outstanding. I frequently debate whether or not to include a review of an untranslated film. Tatiana's work is remarkable. And thank you for the very kind words.

Alexander S said...

Hello again :)

First I have to say that an interest of Russian bloggers to your review on Tatiana Mititello's film was a huge. Unfortunately, they, as a rule, did nothing speak specifically - just noted that the review is good.
here is link -
http://alek-morse.livejournal.com/27137.html

In turn, I have decided to respond on your phrase:

// I could understand if the movie were made in the 1960s when that sort of thing was allegedly de rigeur. In fact it is from the great Soyuzmultfilm Studio and made in 1991 which goes to show I guess that glasnost had much to answer for in the Soviet era. No wonder there was dissolution of the empire although in fairness everything is harmonious on the floating pie. //

Because, finally, my response overgrown an usual reply into a long text, I'd like to welcome you in my Live Journal blog:

http://alek-morse.livejournal.com/28151.html

:)
Alexander Sedov
http://alek-morse.livejournal.com